CACS – ACÉC Conference Program

The program for the upcoming biennial conference can be downloaded here.

An interactive online version can be accessed here.

CACS-ACÉC Plenary Discussion: Beyond the hashtag (Jan. 15, 2016).

1:45-3:15pm | Jan. 15, 2016 | Balsillie School of International Affairs (room TBA) | 67 Erb St. W., Waterloo, ON

Following on the hashtagged acts by scholars–such as the #fergusonsyllabus–in the wake of racial violence and as part of growing social movements such as Idle No More and Black Lives Matter, we wanted to explore race in the postsecondary classroom within the particularities of the Canadian context. Join us on Jan. 15, 2016 at 1:45pm (Balsillie School of International Affairs) for Beyond the Hashtag: Race in the Postsecondary Classroom.

Examining issues such as the affective work of teaching about race, the pedagogical approaches that can contain such teaching, and strategies  of provocation or accommodation (to name only a few), we will be joined by

nkmNaila Keleta-Mae, Assistant Professor of Theatre and Performance at the University of Waterloo, who researches critical race, gender, and performance studies. Her scholarship covers a range of subject matters: from Beyoncé to Canadian federal politics to Amiri Baraka. Dr. Keleta-Mae has been awarded a Lois Claxton Humanities and Social Sciences Award from the University of Waterloo, the New Scholars Prize by the International Federation for Theatre Research, the Mary McEwan Award for feminist scholarship from York University, and the Abella Scholarship for Studies in Equity from York University. Dr. Keleta-Mae is also a poet, recording artist, playwright, and director.

Matthews.CACS.b&wSara Matthews Associate Professor in the Department of Global Studies at Wilfrid Laurier University. Her interdisciplinary work brings aesthetics and cultural theory to the study of violence and the dynamics of social conflict. Her current project, “The Cultural Life of Drones”, explores social responses to technologies of military surveillance and mechanized killing such as drone warfare. With regard to her teaching, Sara is interested in pedagogical approaches that respond to the challenges and possibilities of teaching and learning from representations of war and social conflict. In 2013, she was the recipient of the Faculty of Arts Teaching Scholar Award.

Eve Haque, EhaqueAssociate Professor in the Department of Languages, Literatures and Linguistics and Graduate Program Director of Social and Political Thought at York University in Toronto, Canada. Her research and teaching interests include multiculturalism, white settler nationalism and language policy, with a focus on the regulation and representation of racialized im/migrants in white settler societies. She has published in such journals as Social Identities, Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development and Pedagogy, Culture and Society, among others. She is also the author of, Multiculturalism within a bilingual framework: Language, race and belonging in Canada (University of Toronto Press, 2012).

Darren Thomas, Wilfrid Laurier University. Darren is a member of the Seneca Nation; he is a Bear Clan and he currently resides at the Grand River Territory of the Haudenosaunee. Darren is currently pursuing his PhD in community psychology and works part-time for Wilfrid Laurier University as the Indigenous Studies Liaison. His research has focused on First Nations community development, Indigenous research methodologies, suicide prevention and colonial trauma.

This plenary is open to all. 

 

 

 

Jan. 15, 2016: Film Screening – Hip Hop Eh followed by a discussion with Joseph P.S. Klymkiw and Odario Williams

497856166_640Jan. 15, 2016 | 7-9:30pm | Original Princess Cinema | 6 Princess Street West, Waterloo

Join us for a screening of Hip Hop Eh

The every day person doesn’t know much about the trials and tribulations of the hip hop scene in our great country of Canada. With artists, Maestro Fresh Wes, Kardinal Offishall, Dream Warriors, Michie Mee, Cadence Weapon, Moka Only, Grand Analog, Son Real, Swollen Members and dozens more, this documentary explores the identity of Canadian hip hop and the often unsung artists of the underground scene.

joe copyJoseph PS Klymkiw was born in Brandon Manitoba on March 29th 1980. He was raised in Winnipeg and educated at the University of Ottawa. Director/Producer/Editor Joseph Klymkiw spent many youthful summers in Gimli Manitoba, watching his older cousin’s acclaimed motion picture productions projected through the flickering light of a Bell and Howell Autoload projector upon bed sheets and walls of cottages – soaking up anything and everything Guy Maddin and all that the other iconoclasts of Winnipeg’s Cinematic New Wave had to offer. With this constant exposure to alternative worlds and visions, it’s little wonder that Joseph not only plugged into the Canadian music scene, but that his life now revolves around film. Joseph spurned traditional film school for real world experience and has worked in various roles in production for well over a decade. Starting as Lighting/grip technician and a production assistant, working with speciality camera equipment such as robotics and motion control, he moved into producing through the BC Film Producer internship program and now directs, edits, and produces his own documentaries, music videos, commercials and short films. He works internationally and in the last year alone has produced and directed a feature length documentary in Colombia, has shot and produced a documentary in the wilds of Northern BC, and is working as a consultant on a documentary based out of Jamaica and Ethiopia. Joseph runs his own production company Joi Productions, that specializes in music videos working with budgets ranging from 10k to 50k per music video shoot. In his spare time he started a youtube show about the interesting people in our city called “The Real People of Vancouver” because he felt their stories needed to be told honestly. Joseph also is an avid photographer and spends his spare time creating photography stories from the interesting colour and characters in and around his Gastown neighbourhood.Odario (White Shirt)-2

Odario Williams, frontman of Toronto Hip-Hop collective Grand Analog, was born in Guyana and grew up in Winnipeg, MB. He always considered Winnipeg, where he honed his craft as an entertainer, to be a hotbed for creativity and self expression. He taught himself how to compose songs while studying theatre at the University of Winnipeg. Today he lives in Toronto as a songwriter, actor and rapper. With an extensive tour schedule, his band Grand Analog have performed in numerous international festivals including SXSW (Austin), Great Escape (UK), Reeperbahn (Hamburg), Secret Friends Fest (Detroit) as well as various jazz and folk festivals throughout Canada. Grand Analog’s latest album,War Stories, will be released in 2016. Lately, Odario has been hosting for CBC Radio 3, as well as writing songs for television shows and commercials, including the animated sitcom “Mother Up” and the Pan Am Games ad campaign.

This film screening is free and open to all. 

 

 

Keynote Announcement: Alexander Weheliye (January 16, 2016)

5-6:30 pm | Jan. 16, 2016 | CIGI Auditorium | 67 Erb St. W., Waterloo, ON | reception to follow
We are happy to announce that Dr. Alexander Weheliye will be joining us as keynote speaker for the upcoming CACS-ACÉC conference (January 14-17, 2016).

Weheliye photoHotline Bling: Gendered Technologies in R&B Music

In addition to arguing for the significance of contemporary R&B music—a genre frequently neglected in scholarly debates about popular music—as central to Black culture, Dr. Weheliye’s talk will consider how technologies such as voice processing software and mobile gadgets appear as integral parts of the political and aesthetic fabric of R&B music over the last 25 years. In doing so, the talk makes a broader argument about how deeply gendered and racialized definitions of the technological remain as well as the still fraught relationship between Black culture and technology.

Alexander G. Weheliye is professor of African American Studies at Northwestern University where he teaches black literature and culture, critical theory, social technologies, and popular culture. He is the author of Phonographies: Grooves in Sonic Afro-Modernity (Duke UP, 2005), which was awarded The Modern Language Association’s William Sanders Scarborough Prize for Outstanding Scholarly Study of Black American Literature or Culture and Habeas Viscus: Racializing Assemblages, Biopolitics, and Black Feminist Theories of the Human (Duke UP, 2014). Currently, he is working on two projects. The first, Modernity Hesitant: The Civilizational Diagnostics of W.E.B. Du Bois and Walter Benjamin, tracks the different ways in which these thinkers imagine the marginal as central to the workings of modern civilization. The second, Feenin: R&B’s Technologies of Humanity, offers a critical history of the intimate relationship between R&B music and technology since the late 1970’s. His work has been published and is forthcoming in American Literary History, The Black Scholar, boundary 2, CR: The New Centennial Review, The Journal of Visual Culture, Public Culture, Small Axe, Social Text, and the anthologies Black Europe and The African Diaspora, The Oxford Handbook of Mobile Music Studies, Critical Ethnic Studies, and The Contemporary African American Novel. A selection of his writings can be found here:http://bit.ly/13uHdOa

this event is free and open to all

Deadline Extended! CFP: Disruptions/Perturbations – CACS-ACÉC 2016 Conference/Colloque National

The deadline for abstract submissions for the upcoming 2016 CACS-ACÉC conference has been extended to Oct. 13, 2015.

CFP: Canadian Association of Cultural Studies Biennial Conference

January 14-17, 2016
Balsillie School of International Affairs
Waterloo, Ontario, Canada

Disruptions

The Canadian Association of Cultural Studies invites proposals on all topics of relevance to cultural studies from both current and future members for its upcoming conference.

The conference theme, Disruptions, encourages submissions devoted to exploring disruptions in and of culture. This may include papers that investigate intentional and unintentional, local and global disruptions of established systems or dominant orders; the potential of disruptions to engender shifts in cultural, social, economic, environmental, biopolitical, etc. conditions; forms of activism, social mobilization, and other collective/grassroots based disruptions. Of particular interest this year are papers that address disruptions of cultural ideologies, assumptions, and hegemonies around race, racial construction, and racialization in their various forms. We seek to generate discussion about disruptive cultures and practices. Are such disruptionsdestructive or productive? Cultural or countercultural? Brief or enduring? Do they stem from utopic or dystopic social and cultural visions? Do they produce new cultural forms or reify pre-existing ones? Aredisruptions a normative dimension of culture? What are the ethics of disruptive practices? Who/what is affected when disruptions fail, backfire, or are appropriated? Do disruptive practices require privilege or address disenfranchisement?

We particularly encourage and welcome papers that explore;

– Disruptions (or interruptions) of held assumptions about race, racial identity, processes of racialization
– Social mobilizations/cultural change that may result from such disruptions (including, but not limited to, critical discussions about racial profiling, carding, police brutality, truth and reconciliation, idle no more, etc.)
– Global disruptions of flows of people, goods, ideas and capital
– (More specifically) disruptions in diasporic formation, refugee crises, disruptions of human mobility, etc.
– Disruptions of systems of cultural production, consumption, and representation
– Disruptive technology and media
– Forms of disruptions, ruptures, interruptions, or fractures in political, economic, environmental, technical, communicative, education and/or other cultural systems
– The theoretical and methodological tools that help us understand such disruptions

Submission Guidelines:

Please submit electronically to cacs@wlu.ca an abstract (appended as a .doc or a .docx attachment) of no more than 300 words by Oct. 13, 2015. Please include with your proposal, a paper title, your name and affiliation, 5-8 keywords that represent the major foci of your proposal. Notifications will be sent out in early November. Early bird registration for the conference will open Nov. 9, 2015 at http://cacs-acec.ca/. Regular registration fees will apply after Dec. 4, 2015.

Host/Location:

This conference is hosted at Wilfrid Laurier University, located in Waterloo, Ontario (Canada). Waterloo is located in southwestern Ontario, approximately 110km from Toronto. The city is easily accessed from Toronto Pearson Airport. There are also direct flights into the Waterloo International Airport from Chicago and Calgary (with connections to Vancouver, Edmonton, and other major western cities). VIA Rail service runs to the city from Montreal, Toronto and points west (Windsor, London, etc.). GO train and bus service also connects Waterloo to Toronto. WLU is one of Canada’s fastest growing universities and is home to a vibrant Faculty of Arts, which houses one of only a handful of dedicated Cultural Studies programs in the country. It is also home to several research groups and centres including conference co-sponsor the International Migration Research Centre, the Centre for International Governance Innovation (CIGI), and the Balsillie School of International Affairs, where the conference will be located. As a city located in the heart of Canada’s “Technology Triangle,” home to institutions ranging from the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics to arts institutions including CAFKA (Contemporary Art Forum, Kitchener and Area) and The Museum, it is a place that often sees cultural production at the intersection of science, technology and the arts. Further information about Wilfrid Laurier University, and the Waterloo Region (including transportation and accommodation) will be available on our website; http://www.cacs-acec.ca/. Check back for updates.

…..

14-17 janvier 2016
Balsillie School of International Affairs
Waterloo, Ontario, Canada

Perturbations

En vue de son prochain colloque, l’Association Canadienne des Études Culturelles invite ses membres ainsi que de futurs membres à soumettre des propositions de communication sur tous les sujets relevant des études culturelles.

Le thème du colloque, Perturbations, encourage des communications qui explorent l’ensemble des formes de dérangement culturel. Les communications peuvent porter sur le désordre, intentionnel ou inintentionnel, local ou global, de systèmes établis et dominants; le potentiel des perturbations pour engendrer des changements de conditions culturelles, sociales, économiques, environnementales, biopolitiques, etc.; des formes d’activisme, de mobilisation sociale, et d’autres formes de perturbations collectives ou émergentes. Nous sommes particulièrement intéressés à recevoir des communications touchant les perturbations d’idéologies culturelles, de suppositions et d’hégémonies autour de l’enjeu de la race, de constructions raciales et de la racialisation sous diverses formes. Nous cherchons à engendrer des discussions au sujet de cultures et de pratiques dérangeantes. De telles perturbations sont-elles destructrices ou productives? Culturelles ou contre-culturelles? Brèves ou durables? Émergent-elles de visions socioculturelles utopiques ou dystopiques? Produisent-elles de nouvelles formes culturelles ou en réitèrent-elles d’anciennes? Les perturbations constituent-elles une dimension normative de la culture? Quelle est l’éthique de pratiques dérangeantes? Qui est affecté (ou qu’est-ce qui est affecté) lorsque la perturbation échoue, se retournent contre les instigateurs, ou est appropriée? Les pratiques dérangeantes nécessitent-elles des privilèges ou touchent-elles ceux et celles qui en sont privés?

Nous invitons des communications portant sur les thématiques suivantes (mais ne se limitant pas à cette liste) :
– Les perturbations (ou les interruptions) de suppositions à propos de la race, d’identité raciale et de processus de racialisation
– Les mobilisations sociales et changements culturels qui peuvent résulter de ces perturbations (y compris, mais sans s’y limiter, les discussions critiques à propos de profilage racial, de vérifications aléatoires, de brutalité policière, de vérité et de réconciliation, le mouvement Idle No More, etc.)
– Les perturbations globales de flux de personnes, de biens, d’idées et de capitaux
– (Plus spécifiquement) Les perturbations dans les formations diasporiques, les crises de réfugiés, les perturbations de la mobilité humaine, etc.
– Les perturbations de systèmes de production, de consommation et de représentations culturels
– Les médias et technologies dérangeantes
– Les formes de perturbations, de ruptures, d’interruptions et de fractures dans des systèmes politique, économique, environnemental, technique, communicatif, éducatif ou culturel.
– Les outils théoriques et méthodologiques aidant à comprendre de telles perturbations

Soumission de résumé:

Veuillez soumettre un résumé par voie électronique à cacs@wlu.ca (en attaché sous format .doc ou .docx) ne dépassant pas 300 mots avant le 13 octobre 2015. Veuillez inclure le titre de la communication, le nom et l’affiliation de l’auteur(e) ainsi que 5 à 8 mots-clés qui décrivent au mieux le propos de la communication. Les avis de sélection seront envoyés vers le début du mois de novembre. L’inscription en ligne sera ouverte à partir du 9 novembre 2015 à l’adresse suivante : http://cacs-acec.ca/membership-adhesion/. Les frais réguliers d’inscription seront appliqués après le 4 décembre 2015.

Lieu du colloque :

Le colloque aura lieu à l’Université Wilfrid Laurier située à Waterloo, en Ontario (Canada). Waterloo se trouve dans le sud-ouest de l’Ontario, à environ 110 km de Toronto. La ville est facilement accessible de l’Aéroport International Toronto Pearson. Il existe également des vols directs vers l’Aéroport International de Waterloo en provenance de Chicago et Calgary (avec des connexions à Vancouver, Edmonton et d’autres villes importantes). VIA RAIL offre des services en provenance de Montréal, Ottawa et Toronto qui continuent vers l’ouest (London, Windsor, etc.).

L’Université Wilfrid Laurier fait partie des universités en forte croissance au Canada et comprend une Faculté des arts des plus dynamiques qui possède un des rares programmes en études culturelles au pays. Plusieurs centres et groupes de recherche sont affiliés à l’Université, dont le International Migration Research Centre. L’Université Wilfrid Laurier est également associée au Centre for International Governance Innovation (CIGI) et la Balsillie School of International Affairs, qui accueillera le colloque.

Waterloo est au cœur du « triangle technologique » du Canada, où se trouvent le Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics ainsi que des institutions artistiques réputées tels CAFKA (Contemporary Art Forum, Kitchener et environs) et The Museum. La ville offre donc un milieu des plus enrichissants pour la création de productions culturelles à l’intersection des arts, de la science et de la technologie. De plus amples informations sur l’Université Wilfrid Laurier et sur la région de Waterloo (dont les modalités de transports et d’hébergement) seront bientôt disponibles sur notre site http://www.cacs-acec.ca/. Revenez nous voir bientôt !​

Disruptions/Perturbations 2016: CFP

Our next conference will be held Jan. 14-17, 2016 at the Balsillie School of International Affairs in Waterloo, Ontario (Canada). We welcome proposals on all topics of relevance to cultural studies from our current and future members. Our call for papers can be found here et pour la version française, cliquez ici.

The conference theme, Disruptions, encourages submissions devoted to exploring disruptions in and of culture. This may include papers that investigate intentional and unintentional, local and global disruptions of established systems or dominant orders; the potential of disruptions to engender shifts in cultural, social, economic, environmental, biopolitical, etc. conditions; forms of activism, social mobilization, and other collective/grassroots based disruptions. Of particular interest this year are papers that address disruptions of cultural ideologies, assumptions, and hegemonies around race, racial construction, and racialization in their various forms. We seek to generate discussion about disruptive cultures and practices. Are such disruptions destructive or productive? Cultural or countercultural? Brief or enduring? Do they stem from utopic or dystopic social and cultural visions? Do they produce new cultural forms or reify pre-existing ones? Are disruptions a normative dimension of culture? What are the ethics of disruptive practices? Who/what is affected when disruptions fail, backfire, or are appropriated? Do disruptive practices require privilege or address disenfranchisement?

This conference is hosted at Wilfrid Laurier University, located in Waterloo, Ontario (Canada). Waterloo is located in southwestern Ontario, approximately 110km from Toronto. The city is easily accessed from Toronto Pearson Airport. There are also direct flights into the Waterloo International Airport from Chicago, Ottawa, and Calgary (with connections to Vancouver, Edmonton, and other major western cities). VIA Rail service runs to the city from Montreal, Toronto and points west (Windsor, London, etc.). GO train and bus service also connects Waterloo to Toronto.

…..

En vue de son prochain colloque, l’Association Canadienne des Études Culturelles invite ses membres ainsi que de futurs membres à soumettre des propositions de communication sur tous les sujets relevant des études culturelles.

Le thème du colloque, Perturbations, encourage des communications qui explorent l’ensemble des formes de dérangement culturel. Les communications peuvent porter sur le désordre, intentionnel ou inintentionnel, local ou global, de systèmes établis et dominants; le potentiel des perturbations pour engendrer des changements de conditions culturelles, sociales, économiques, environnementales, biopolitiques, etc.; des formes d’activisme, de mobilisation sociale, et d’autres formes de perturbations collectives ou émergentes. Nous sommes particulièrement intéressés à recevoir des communications touchant les perturbations d’idéologies culturelles, de suppositions et d’hégémonies autour de l’enjeu de la race, de constructions raciales et de la racialisation sous diverses formes. Nous cherchons à engendrer des discussions au sujet de cultures et de pratiques dérangeantes. De telles perturbations sont-elles destructrices ou productives? Culturelles ou contre-culturelles? Brèves ou durables? Émergent-elles de visions socioculturelles utopiques ou dystopiques? Produisent-elles de nouvelles formes culturelles ou en réitèrent-elles d’anciennes? Les perturbations constituent-elles une dimension normative de la culture? Quelle est l’éthique de pratiques dérangeantes? Qui est affecté (ou qu’est-ce qui est affecté) lorsque la perturbation échoue, se retournent contre les instigateurs, ou est appropriée? Les pratiques dérangeantes nécessitent-elles des privilèges ou touchent-elles ceux et celles qui en sont privés?

Le colloque aura lieu à l’Université Wilfrid Laurier située à Waterloo, en Ontario (Canada). Waterloo se trouve dans le sud-ouest de l’Ontario, à environ 110 km de Toronto. La ville est facilement accessible de l’Aéroport International Toronto Pearson. Il existe également des vols directs vers l’Aéroport International de Waterloo en provenance de Chicago, Ottawa et Calgary (avec des connexions à Vancouver, Edmonton et d’autres villes importantes). VIA RAIL offre des services en provenance de Montréal, Ottawa et Toronto qui continuent vers l’ouest (London, Windsor, etc.).

Stay tuned…

Check back here in the next couple of weeks for information about the 2016 CACS-ACEC biennial conference as well as new membership information…

CACS-ACÉC: Call for EoI/Appel à manifestation d’intérêt

cacsimagecobblesCall for Expressions of Interest to Host the Canadian Association of Cultural Studies

The CACS Advisory Board is currently soliciting Expressions of Interest (EOI) for a new host for the organization beginning in 2017. CACS is currently housed at Wilfrid Laurier University in southwestern Ontario. According to the CACS constitution, the organization is to rotate every four years to a new institution and, preferably, a new region.

Members of the new host institution, along with members from the region, will form a new On-Site Committee (OSC) and OSC Executive that will be responsible for the day-to-day operation of the organization, including its finances, membership, and web presence, and is mandated to run a conference for CACS in alternating years (for two in total). The On-Site Committee Executive consists of 6 positions: Chair, Treasurer, Conference Chair, Communications Chair, Chair of Cultural Action and Activism, and Online Coordinator. The OSC and executive will work in conjunction with the CACS Advisory Board, which, according to the CACS constitution “provides advice and direction to the OSC related to matters which are of importance to CACS beyond the day-to-day running of the organization. The Advisory Board may only make decisions for CACS in consultation with the OSC.” The current Advisory Board consists of 7 members and will make every effort to provide continuity for CACS during the transition. For more information about the organization and infrastructure of CACS, see the “organization” page of our website; http://cacs-acec.ca/organization/ (see also, the CACS Constitution, which is linked at the bottom of that page). CACS is a bilingual organization.

Although the transfer from CACS’ current home at Wilfrid Laurier University to its new home should be completed by Jan. 2017, the first conference for which the new host would be responsible can take place in 2018 (the exact date of the conference is up to the new OSC Executive and can be variable).

Hosting CACS is a valuable opportunity to develop space not only for cultural studies research, but for public outreach with local social, political, and community groups. Those interested in hosting CACS will want to consider the organizations’ two intersecting mandates:

  1.  To promote the interests of those teaching and studying cultural studies in Canada by facilitating the dissemination and exchange of research nationally and internationally, by exploring professional issues, and by organizing scholarly and professional meetings.
  2.  To create greater public spaces across Canada for the development of productive relationships between people from institutional and non-institutional sites. To this end we aim to make connections with, and plan activities in concert with social, political and community groups. These activities may include, but are not limited to, the production and dissemination of pamphlets, working papers and other materials designed as interventions into public discussions of current social, political and cultural issues.

If you are interested in providing an institutional home for CACS please send a brief (approx 500 words) statement expressing your interest as a host to directly to the CACS President of the Advisory Board, Catherine Burwell, cburwell[at]ucalgary[dot]ca, no later than March 2nd 2015. The board will review proposals and contact interested parties by April 15th 2015.

The statement should outline:

  •  general information about the planned institutional host and how this host may provide a beneficial home for CACS (ie. proximity to other institutions; affiliations with cultural organizations activisms etc.; host to cultural studies departments/research)
  •  possibilities for institutional support (both in-kind and direct financial support, if possible)
  •  one or more key organizational figures (ie. OSC Chair) and ideally an outline of the OSC Executive
  •  your organizational capacity (access to facilities and venues, lodging, funding, labour, etc.)

Current On-Site Committee Chair, Alexandra Boutros (aboutros [at] wlu [dot] ca) and President of the Advisory Board, Catherine Burwell (cburwell [at] ucalgary [dot] ca), are happy to speak with you further about the current needs of CACS, conditions of a transfer, or anything else you may have questions about with regards to hosting the organization. Please don’t hesitate to be in touch.

Appel à manifestation d’intérêt pour accueillir l’Association canadienne des études culturelles

Le conseil consultatif de l’ACÉC est à la recherche d’une nouvelle institution pour héberger l’organisation, de 2017 à 2021. L’ACÉC est actuellement hébergée par l’Université Wilfrid Laurier dans le sud-ouest de l’Ontario. Selon la constitution de l’ACÉC, l’organisation doit changer d’institution d’accueil, et préférablement de région si possible, à tous les quatre ans.

Les membres de la nouvelle institution d’accueil, avec les membres de la région, formeront le comité des lieux (CDL) et l’exécutif du CDL, qui sera responsable du fonctionnement au quotidien de l’organisation, incluant les finances, les abonnements et la présence en ligne. L’exécutif du CDL sera également délégué pour élaborer deux colloques biannuels pour l’ACÉC. Cet exécutif est composé de 6 postes: président/e, trésorier/ière, coordonnateur/trice des colloques, coordonnateur/trice des communications, coordonnateur/trice de l’action culturelle et de l’activisme et coordonnateur/trice des activités en ligne. Le CDL et l’exécutif travailleront de pair avec le comité consultatif de l’ACÉC qui, selon la constitution de l’ACÉC, «fournit conseils et directives au CDL à propos des sujets importants pour l’ACÉC au-delà de la gestion quotidienne de l’organisation. Le comité consultatif ne peut prendre des décisions qu’en consultation avec le CDL.» Le comité consultatif est composé de 7 membres et fera tout en son pouvoir pour effectuer une transition stable et harmonieuse. Pour plus d’informations au sujet de l’organisation et de sa structure, voir la page «Organisation» de notre site Web: http://cacs-acec.ca/organisation/ (voir également la constitution de l’ACÉC, en anglais seulement, mise en lien au bas de cette page). L’ACÉC est une organisation bilingue.

Même si la transition entre l’institution actuelle de l’ACÉC et sa nouvelle institution d’accueil devrait être finalisée en janvier 2017, le premier colloque réalisé sous l’égide de la nouvelle institution d’accueil pourrait avoir lieu en 2018 (les dates exactes du colloque seraient à déterminer par l’exécutif du CDL et peuvent varier).

Accueillir l’ACÉC est une opportunité considérable pour développer non seulement l’espace pour la recherche en études culturelles, mais aussi pour soutenir la sensibilisation du public à travers des groupes locaux, politiques et communautaires. En ce sens, voici les deux mandats intersectés de l’organisation:

  1.  Promouvoir les intérêts de ceux et celles qui enseignent et qui étudient les études culturelles au Canada, en facilitant la circulation et les échanges nationaux et internationaux des recherches, en explorant les enjeux professionnels et en organisant des rencontres savantes et professionnelles.
  2.  Créer davantage d’espaces publics à travers le Canada pour le développement de relations productives et efficaces entre les individus provenant de sites institutionnels et non-institutionnels. Pour ce faire, nous projetons établir des ponts avec des groupes sociaux, politiques et communautaires, en plus de planifier des activités avec ces groupes. Ces activités peuvent inclure la production et la circulation de brochures, de documents de travail et d’autres pièces visant à intervenir dans les débats publics au sujet d’enjeux sociaux, politiques et culturels, mais elles ne se limitent pas à celles-ci.

Si votre institution est intéressée à héberger l’ACÉC, veuillez envoyer une brève déclaration (approximativement 500 mots) exprimant votre intérêt directement à Catherine Burwell, la présidente du conseil consultatif de l’ACÉC, au cburwell[at]ucalgary[dot]ca , au plus tard le 2 mars 2015. Le conseil passera en revue les propositions et contactera l’institution intéressée le 15 avril 2015.

La déclaration doit inclure:

  •  les informations générales au sujet de l’hôte institutionnel et les manières dont cet hôte accueillera avantageusement l’ACÉC (c’est-à-dire la proximité d’autres institutions; les affiliations avec des organisations d’activisme, etc.; la présence de recherche ou de départements favorables aux études culturelles)
  •  les possibilités pour le soutien institutionnel (à la fois en nature et en espèces, si possible)
  •  une ou plusieurs membres-clés de l’organisation (par exemple, la direction du CDL) et idéalement, une ébauche de l’exécutif du CDL.
  •  la capacité organisationnelle de votre institution (l’accès au site et aux installations, l’hébergement, le financement, les ressources humaines, etc.)

La directrice actuelle du CDL, Alexandra Boutros (aboutros[at]wlu[dot]ca), et la présidente du comité consultatif, Catherine Burwell (), seront heureuses de répondre à vos questions à propos de l’ACÉC, ses besoins, les conditions de la transition, ou quelconque autre sujet de questionnements ayant rapport avec l’hébergement de l’organisation. N’hésitez pas à nous contacter.

 

Dispersions 2014: CACS-ACÉC On-line Conference Schedule now live

An online version of the CACS-ACÉC 2014 Conference Schedule is now available here; http://cacs-acec.ca/dispersions-conference-schedule/.

Please note that you can download abstracts for each panel. Look for a link toward the bottom of the page or panel menu. You can also tweet directly from the online schedule (look for the Twitter button in the top right). Our hashtags are #CACS14 and #ACEC14.

Roundtable Panel: Mixing Ingredients

IMG_5702CACS-ACÉC presents a rountable discussion

Mixing Ingredients: Bringing Food Research Outside the University

January 16, 2014, 7pm, Balsillie School of International Affairs (Rm 145)

Panelists
Andrew Bieler, Communication & Culture, York University

Michelle Coyne, Second Harvest, Toronto, Ontario

Charles Levkoe, Postdoctoral Fellow, Wilfrid Laurier University

Steffanie Scott, Geography & Environmental Management, University of Waterloo

Food connects us. This simple statement reveals how the food we consume, research, refuse to eat, or throw away structures our everyday local and global lives, This roundtable–comprised of academics, advocates, activists, organizers, and artists–will explore how food research moves across both disciplinary and institutional borders and takes up residence outside academic confines and discourses. This conversation will be an opportunity to explore how academic thinking can be translated through the study of food in such a way as to be useful outside of university structures.